45 percent of specialists admit having made a recently available medical error Otolaryngologist Dr.

In the August issue of the journal Laryngoscope The study may be the cover article. The likelihood of an otolaryngologist erring on any individual decision is normally miniscule, the authors note. .. 45 percent of specialists admit having made a recently available medical error Otolaryngologist Dr. David Roberson provides first-hand encounter with medical errors. I looked at the CT scan cautiously to determine if the cochlea would acknowledge the implant, recalls Roberson, from the Department of Otolaryngology and Conversation Disorders at Children’s Hospital Boston.* Treating traumatic brain damage. Moderated by Dr. Timothy A. Pedley, chairman and professor of the Division of Neurology at Columbia University College of Doctors and Surgeons, and neurologist-in-chief at NewYork-Presbyterian Medical center/Columbia University INFIRMARY, the panel program will focus on neurological areas of trauma-related brain injury and ways to assess and address it. * Addressing PTSD and related disorders – – including depression, nervousness, substance and suicide abuse – – among veterans and their families. Published in the July 1, 2006 issue of CANCER, a peer-examined journal of the American Cancer tumor Society, the record reveals that employment problems differed by cancer type, with survivors of some cancers types up to five situations more likely to become unemployed.